Conducting good, ethical global health research is now more important than ever. Increased global mobility and connectivity mean that in today’s world there is no such thing as ‘local health’. As a collection, these stories offer a flexible resource for training across a variety of contexts, such as medical research organizations, universities, collaborative sites, and NGOs. 

12th November 2017 • comment

This short film shows the impact of the CHAPAS trial on patient health and future possibilities of a small boy from Malawi.

14th March 2017 • comment

This is a great video of a talk given at the Oxford Martin School by Professor Kevin Marsh.

10th March 2017 • comment

This book is a collection of fictionalised case studies of everyday ethical dilemmas and challenges, encountered in the process of conducting global health research in places where the effects of global, political and economic inequality are particularly evident. 

23rd November 2016 • comment

The Good Clinical Practices (GCP) codes of the WHO and the International Conference of Harmonization set international standards for clinical research. But critics argue that they were written without consideration for the challenges faced in low and middle income countries (LMICs).

17th November 2016 • comment

In this week's episode the team discuss the latest stories on global maternal mortality, chikungunya in India, and sanitary pads in India.

23rd September 2016 • comment

How the war in Syria is decimating human resources for health and health systems.

20th July 2016 • comment

This study highlights the utility of rapid ethical assessment prior to clinical trials involving complex procedures and concepts.

23rd March 2016 • comment

Video of Professor Peter Horby, the University of Oxford, on how he and his team set up clinical trials in the heart of the Ebola outbreak.

26th November 2015 • comment

Professor Lang talks about doing difficult trials in difficult places - including malaria and ebola trials.

19th October 2015 • comment

Investigator initiated pragmatic clinical trials rather than explanatory clinical trials are needed. Collaborative trials should give something back to the community.

6th July 2015 • comment

Strengthening capacity to apply health research evidence in policy making: experience from four countries

by Sarah Hawkes, Bhupinder K Aulakh, Nidhee Jadeja, Michelle Jimenez, Kent Buse, Iqbal Anwar, Sandhya Barge, M. Oladoyin Odubanjo, Abhay Shukla, Abdul Ghaffar, Jimmy Whitworth

Little experience of strengthening the capacity of policy makers in low- and middle- income countries has been published to date. This article describe the experiences of five projects (in Bangladesh, Gambia, India and Nigeria) - author available to comment!

8th May 2015 • comment

Professor Peter Piot, LSHTM, talks about Ebola and implications for Africa and understanding future epidemics at the Martin School, University of Oxford, 16th October 2014.

17th October 2014 • comment

The Ebola virus epidemic may well spread out of Africa. Dr Greg Martin takes a look at some of the variables that contribute to this risk and discusses some steps that should be taken.

18th August 2014 • comment

Assessing the quality of informed consent in a resource-limited setting: A cross-sectional study

by Ronald Kiguba, Paul Kutyabami, Stephen Kiwuwa, Elly Katabira, Nelson K Sewankambo

The process of obtaining informed consent continues to be a contentious issue in clinical and public health research carried out in resource-limited settings. We sought to evaluate this process among human research participants in randomly selected active research studies approved by the School of Medicine Research and Ethics Committee at the College of Health Sciences, Makerere University.

6th September 2012 • comment

One fundamental ethical principle underpinning research ethics is that of respect for persons. It requires that researchers respect research participants’ autonomy, interests, and wishes, and act on the presumption that participants are the best judges of what their interests are (Nuffield Council on Bioethics 2002). This presumption obliges us to design consent processes for research that facilitate prospective participants’ free and informed decisions as to whether or not to participate in a study.

21st February 2012 • comment